An Australian doctor says prostate biopsies are a ‘bizarre, illogical and confusing procedure’

A Melbourne surgeon says the process of performing prostate biopies is ‘illogical, confusing and bizarre’.

Dr Andrew Jardine is a paediatrician in the state of Victoria.

He told the ABC he is concerned about the risks involved in the procedure, and has been researching the matter since 2012.

He says the practice is fraught with danger, but said it should not be used as a routine procedure.

“It’s the most bizarre, illogically and confusing process that I’ve ever seen,” Dr Jardines said.

“I’m not aware of any clinical trials of it and I’ve never seen it in any Australian clinical trial, which is quite a bit of work for a simple test.”

But it is a procedure that, when done properly, will allow a woman to be able to test for cervical cancer.

“Dr Jardiner said the tests were used for cervical cancers that were found to be growing on the cervix.”

Dr Robert Vats, from the University of Queensland, said prostate biopersies were not as common in Australia as they are in the US.””

It is a relatively rare procedure that has only been performed on women in the United States.”

Dr Robert Vats, from the University of Queensland, said prostate biopersies were not as common in Australia as they are in the US.

“We know the test is very accurate,” he told ABC News Breakfast.

“So, if it’s a healthy test and a good test and it’s performed correctly, it will be successful.”

Dr Vats said there were two common risks of the procedure: that it might cause damage to the cervis, and that the woman might be unable to have a normal life without the test.

He said it was important that the tests weren’t performed when a woman was pregnant, because of the risk of the cervicovaginal fluid that was left behind after a test.

Topics:health,cancer,sexual-health,health-policy,women,women-health-and-femininity,sexuality,abortion,australia